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CAMERAS

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  • Satellite image map of Stefansson Bay, Kemp Land and Mac. Robertson Land, Antarctica. This map was produced for the Australian Antarctic Division by AUSLIG (now Geoscience Australia) Commercial, in Australia, in 1992. The map is at a scale of 1:100000, and was produced from Landsat TM scenes (WRS 139-107, 137-107). It is projected on a Transverse Mercator projection, and shows glaciers/ice shelves, penguin colonies, refuge/depots, and gives some historical text information. The map has both geographical and UTM co-ordinates.

  • This dataset consists of two shapefiles created by Darren Southwell of the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) by digitising the boundaries of adelie penguin colonies at the Rauer Group and the Vestfold Hills. The digitising was done from images resulting from the scanning and georeferencing of aerial photographs taken on 24 November 1993. The aerial photographs were taken for the AAD with a Linhof camera. Records of the photographs are included in the Australian Antarctic Data Centre's Aerial Photograph Catalogue.

  • Satellite image map of Amanda Bay, Antarctica. This map was produced for the Australian Antarctic Division by AUSLIG (now Geoscience Australia) Commercial, in Australia, in 1991. The map is at a scale of 1:100 000, and was produced from Landsat 4 TM imagery (124-108, 124-109). It is projected on a Transverse Mercator projection, and shows traverses/routes/foot track charts, glaciers/ice shelves, penguin colonies, stations/bases, runways/helipads, and gives some historical text information. The map has both geographical and UTM co-ordinates.

  • Four camera tow transects were completed on the upper slope during survey IN2017_V01 using the Marine National Facility’s Deep Tow Camera. This system collected oblique facing still images with a Canon – 1DX camera and high definition video with a Canon – C300 system. Four SeaLite Sphere lights provided illumination and two parallel laser beams 10 cm apart provided a reference scale for the images. This dataset presents results from the analysis of the still imagery. All camera tows were run at a ship speed over the ground of approximately 2 knots. Several sensors were attached to the towed body, including a SBE 37 CTD for collection of salinity, temperature and pressure data, a Kongsberg Mesotech altimeter and a Sonardynne beacon to record the location of the towed body. Transects were run downslope from the continental shelf break, with images analysed over a depth range of ~495 m to 670-725 m. Biota and substrates were characterised for every fifth image according to the CATAMI image classification scheme (Collaborative and Automated Tools for Analysis of Marine Imagery, Althaus et al., 2015). Images were loaded into the online platform SQUIDLE+ for analysis. Biota were counted as presence/absence of all visible biota for each image. Percent biological cover and substrate type for the whole image was calculated based on analysis of 30 random points across each image. Percent cover calculations were standardised according to the proportion of scored points on each image, excluding those that were too dark to classify. A total of 203 images were analysed. Images are available from: http://dap.nci.org.au/thredds/remoteCatalogService?catalog=http://dapds00.nci.org.au/thredds/catalog/fk1/IN2017_V01_Sabrina_Seafloor/catalog.xml

  • The dataset submitted here is 'Sea-ice freeboard derived from airborne laser scanner'. Between 2007 and 2012, the Australian Antarctic program operated a scanning LiDAR system and other scientific instruments for sea-ice geophysical surveys in East Antarctica. For example see Lieser et al. [2013] for the 2012 survey. The dataset here provides the sea-ice freeboard (i.e. elevation above sea level) along various helicopter flight lines of the 2012 survey in the sea-ice zone between 113 degE and 123 degE. The data collection was based on: - Riegl LMS Q240i-60 scanning LiDAR, measuring sea ice elevation above the WGS84 reference ellipsoid; - Hasselblad H3D II 50 camera, taking aerial photographs at about 13 cm resolution every 3-5 seconds (older digital camera used in 2007); - inertial navigation and global positioning system, OxTS RT-4003. The following geophysical corrections were applied to the sea-ice elevations to derive the sea-ice freeboard: - geoid correction (from the EGM2008 Earth gravity model); - mean ocean dynamic topography correction (from the DTU Space model - DTU10MDT); - ocean tide correction (from the Earth and Space Research CATS2008 Antarctic tide model); - atmospheric pressure (inverse barometer effect) correction from ECMWF data (4-year average) and ship-board underway observations. The geophysical corrections have been validated along selected flight lines by extracting ocean surface elevations from leads between ice floes as identified in the aerial photography. Contained in this dataset are the following files: - a netCDF file for 8 selected flights of the 2012 survey containing sea-ice freeboard values; - a postscript file for 4 of the 8 selected flights showing the residuals from the applied geophysical corrections. These 4 flights were selected on the basis of having a good spread of observable leads along the entire flight line that enabled the extraction of ocean surface elevations.

  • GEBCO’s (General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans) gridded bathymetric data set, the GEBCO_2019 Grid, is a global terrain model for ocean and land, providing elevation data, in meters, on a 15 arc-second interval grid. The GEBCO 2019 grid is reformatted as a Cloud Optimised GeoTIFF suitable for online requests and republished for use primarily by software development. Original GEBCO grid was obtained from https://www.gebco.net/data_and_products/gridded_bathymetry_data/gebco_2019/gebco_2019_info.html

  • These aerial survey data of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) off southern Australia were collected in August 2017. Such annual flights in winter/spring between Cape Leeuwin (Western Australia) and Ceduna (South Australia) have now been conducted over a 25-year period 1993-2017. These surveys have provided evidence of a population trend of around 6% per year, and a current (at 2014) population size of approximately 2300 of what has been regarded as the 'western' Australian right whale subpopulation. With estimated population size in the low thousands, it is presumed to be still well below carrying capacity. No trend information is available for the 'eastern' subpopulation of animals occurring around the remainder of the southern Australian Coast, to at least as far as Sydney, New South Wales and the populations size is relatively small, probably in the low hundreds. A lower than expected 'western' count in 2015 gives weak evidence that the growth rate may be starting to show signs of slowing, though an exponential increase remains the best description of the data. If the low 2015 count is anomalous, future counts may be expected to show an exponential increase, but if it is not, modelling growth as other than simple exponential may be useful to explore in future

  • These aerial survey data of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) off southern Australia were collected in August 2018. Such annual flights in winter/spring between Cape Leeuwin (Western Australia) and Ceduna (South Australia) have now been conducted over a 26-year period 1993-2018. These surveys have provided evidence of a population trend of around 6% per year, and a current (at 2014) population size of approximately 2300 of what has been regarded as the 'western' Australian right whale subpopulation. With estimated population size in the low thousands, it is presumed to be still well below carrying capacity. No trend information is available for the 'eastern' subpopulation of animals occurring around the remainder of the southern Australian Coast, to at least as far as Sydney, New South Wales and the populations size is relatively small, probably in the low hundreds. A lower than expected 'western' count in 2015 gives weak evidence that the growth rate may be starting to show signs of slowing, though an exponential increase remains the best description of the data. If the low 2015 count is anomalous, future counts may be expected to show an exponential increase, but if it is not, modelling growth as other than simple exponential may be useful to explore in future.

  • An occupancy survey on 26 January 2012 found 1 island (70166) along the coast between 111 degrees 00'E - 111 degrees 10'E had populations of breeding Adelie penguins. The survey was conducted from a fixed wing aircraft and oblique aerial photographs were taken of the occupied site. The aerial photographs were geo-referenced to the coastline shapefile from the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA, tile E158) and the boundaries of penguin colonies were digitised from the geo-referenced photos with not intentional buffer. Note the quality of the aerial photos was poor and so the resultant boundary mapping will not be very accurate. Also in the Balaena Islands there is a historic record from the 50s of penguins nesting on Thompson Islet (70166). When aerial photos were taken of this island penguins could not be detected. Please refer to the Seabird Conservation Team Data Sharing Policy for use, acknowledgement and availability of data prior to downloading data.

  • These aerial survey data of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) off southern Australia were collected in August 2019. Such annual flights in winter/spring between Cape Leeuwin (Western Australia) and Ceduna (South Australia) have now been conducted over a 27-year period 1993-2019. These surveys have provided evidence of a population trend of around 6% per year, and a current (at 2014) population size of approximately 2300 of what has been regarded as the 'western' Australian right whale subpopulation. With estimated population size in the low thousands, it is presumed to be still well below carrying capacity. No trend information is available for the 'eastern' subpopulation of animals occurring around the remainder of the southern Australian Coast, to at least as far as Sydney, New South Wales and the populations size is relatively small, probably in the low hundreds. A lower than expected 'western' count in 2015 gives weak evidence that the growth rate may be starting to show signs of slowing, though an exponential increase remains the best description of the data. If the low 2015 count is anomalous, future counts may be expected to show an exponential increase, but if it is not, modelling growth as other than simple exponential may be useful to explore in future.