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environment

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    Temperature loggers have been deployed at a range of sites statewide in waters ranging between 6 and 22m depth. From 2012, 27 sites around Tasmania are being monitored. This record shows data collected from 2004 up to December 2020. Data is still being collected (June 2021) and will be added to this collection as it becomes available.

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    Marine benthic habitat data for Tasmanian coastal waters from the LWM (Low water mark) to 40 metres in depth or 1.5 kms from shore. A full breakdown of habitat classifications is available on the SeaMap Tasmania website: http://seamap.imas.utas.edu.au/habitats/

  • Total Organic Carbon A 2 g homogenised wet sediment sub-sample from each core was weighed into a pre-combusted crucible and dried at 105 degrees C. The dried sample was reweighed before being analysed for total carbon by mass loss on ignition at 550 degrees C, the sample was placed in the muffle furnace for 4 hours. Samples 56698, 57062, 56837, 57058, and 580792 were analysed in triplicate to assess the reproducibility of the analytical procedure. (Total number of analyses was 117). - TOC - For the 107 samples: - Mean and SD: 3 plus or minus 4 % DMB, range: 0.16-15 %, n=107 - Considering the mean values for the 27 site locations: - Range: 0.33-14 % DMB, mean and SD: 3.3 plus or minus 3.7 % DMB, n=27 - Analytical uncertainty - Analytical precision: 5 samples analysed in triplicate: - RSD = 6 plus or minus 5% range 1-11%, n=5 - Site heterogeneity: reproducibility (RSD) of mean data from site replicate samples was 26% (mean, SD 15%, range 10-57%, n=27) - From the limited data on reproducibility summarised above, it can be concluded that site heterogeneity contributes most to the uncertainty of the TOC data for the site locations. - DMF - For the 107 samples: - Mean and SD: 0.57 plus or minus 0.23 %, range: 0.09-0.85, n=107 - Considering the mean values for the 27 site locations: - Range:0.17-0.83, mean and SD: 0.57 plus or minus 0.22, n=27 - Analytical uncertainty - Analytical precision: 5 samples analysed in triplicate: - RSD = 2 plus or minus 2% range 0.8-5%, n=5 - Site heterogeneity: reproducibility (RSD) of mean data from site replicate samples (mostly quadruplicates) was 10% (mean, SD 10%, range 1-37%, n=27) - From the limited data on reproducibility summarised above, it can be concluded that site heterogeneity contributes most to the uncertainty of the DMF data for the site locations. Collection of sediment cores Sediment for grain size and various chemical analysis were sampled using a core of PVC tubing (15cm long x 5cm diameter) pushed 10cm into the sediment. These cores were kept upright at all times to ensure the stratigraphy remained intact and frozen in the core tube at -20 degrees C. Grain size analysis The outer 5 mm edge of the core was removed with a scalpel blade and placed in a clean, dried preweighed beaker. The sample was weighed and placed in an oven at 45 degrees C to dry. Once dry the sample was reweighed and then sieved through a 2 mm sieve, any residual sediment in the beaker was weighed and the weight recorded. The less than 2 mm fraction and the greater than 2 mm fraction were separately collected and weighed. A 5 g sample of the less than 2 mm fraction was taken for grain size analysis which was carried out using the Mastersizer 2000 Particle Size Analyser by Associate Professor Damian Gore at the Department of Physical Geography, Macquarie University, Sydney.

  • This project monitored plastics at the four-bays area on Heard Island and at Sandell Bay on Macquarie Island. It characterised plastics by infra-red spectroscopy both from the beach collection and small pieces from fur-seal stomachs and cormorant boluses. The aim was to assess human impact on the ocean by measuring plastic abundance and type.

  • Metadata record for data from ASAC Project 2665 See the link below for public details on this project. The Antarctic environment with its harsh climatic conditions, minimal human activity and its unique ecosystems is unlike any of the World's other environments. As such, it is important that an understanding of the Antarctic environment is developed in order to gain a full appreciation of the impacts of human activities in Antarctica and to determine the most effective means to remediate and protect the Antarctic environment. To achieve these goals, new sensitive and selective techniques for sampling metal contaminant levels in marine sediments are being developed. The project is not an environmental study of the Antarctic environment (ie no metal concentrations in water or sediments), but rather the development of an analytical technique for use in Antarctica. We are still in the process of developing this technique and much of the development phase has involved qualitative assessment rather than generating quantitative data. We are currently trialling the technique in the lab and will conduct field trials in the Derwent Estuary. Taken from the abstract of the referenced paper: A novel binding phase was developed for use in diffusive gradients in thin-film (DGT) sampling for Cu(II) by employing methylthymol blue as a chelating and chromogenic agent. Methylthymol blue was adsorbed onto beads of Dowex 1x8 resin (200-400 mesh) and the resin beads were then immobilised onto an adhesive disc. Analysis of exposed binding discs by either UV-vis spectrophotometry or computer imaging densitometry provided robust quantification of adsorbed Cu(II) in the 0.2-1 micro gcm-2 range, allowing detection at micro gL-1 concentrations in the test solution (ca. 17 micro gL-1 for a 24 h deployment), and in good agreement with established DGT theory. The method was shown to be a potential replacement for binding phases based on Chelex 100 where a colorimetric response to a specific metal is desired.

  • This dataset contains the results of replicate experiments which measured the total hydrocarbon content (THC) in water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of three fuels; Special Antarctic Blend diesel, Marine Gas oil and intermediate fuel oil IFO 180.

  • This dataset contains the results of experiments that measured the total hydrocarbon content (THC) in water accommodated fractions (WAF) of fuel in seawater. The three fuel types were: Special Antarctic Blend diesel (SAB), Marine Gas Oil diesel (MGO) and an intermediate grade (180) of marine bunker Fuel Oil (IFO). These tests were performed under conditions which conformed to protocols used in Project 3054 toxicity tests conducted on Antarctic and subantarctic marine invertebrates. These hydrocarbon data show measured concentrations of THC in WAFs over time. From these data exposure concentrations of THC can be derived for analysis of sensitivities of marine invertebrates exposed to these WAFs in bioassays of Antarctic and subantarctic marine invertebrates. The integrated exposure concentrations calculated from these data are held in datasets AAS_3054_THC_WAF_integ_ conc_ 09_10 and AAS_3054_THC_WAF_integ_ conc_10_11_12. Fuels were experimentally mixed by slow stir of fuel and seawater in temperature controlled cabinets at 0 degrees C and 5 degrees C to prepare a mixture of fuel hydrocarbons in filtered seawater (FSW). WAF was produced by adding fuel to seawater in 10 L glass bottles. Mixtures were stirred at slow speed with minimal vortex. The freshly decanted WAFs were sampled and an additional set of time series experiments sampled the THC in dilutions of decanted WAFs in open containers, to show the loss of hydrocarbons over time at 0 degrees C and 5 degrees C. WAF samples were extracted and THC in micrograms per litre was measured using gas-chromatograph flame ionising detection (GC_FID) analysis. The dataset consists of an Excel spreadsheet. The first worksheet 'Test description' gives details of test setup and conditions, and explanation of acronyms. The following worksheets show the THC in test samples, with a separate worksheet for each test. Two worksheets 'Raw data' show the data from GC_FID analysis.

  • We observed total thickness (snow thickness + ice thickness) of sea-ice floes along 100m transects using an electromagnetic (EM) sensor. The data were read from the EM and written by hand into a log book as we moved along the transect. They were then transferred into an Excel spreadsheet. The parameters included are: - distance along transect - conductivity (vertical) - conductivity (horizontal) - total thickness (derived from vertical and horizontal conductivities)

  • Depth related changes in sediment characteristics and the composition of infaunal invertebrate communities were investigated at two sites in the Windmill Islands around Casey station, East Antarctica, during the 2006/07 summer. Sediment characteristics were investigated via sediment cores (5cm deep x 5cm diameter) collected from 4 depths (7m, 11m, 17, and 22m) from each of three transects at two sites (McGrady Cove and O'Brien Bay 1). Measured sediment characteristics included grain size distribution, total organic carbon and the concentration of a range of heavy metals. This work was conducted as part of ASAC 2201 (ASAC_2201).

  • Metadata record for data from ASAC Project 2179 See the link below for public details on this project. Taken from a progress report of the project written in 1998: 60 terrestrial sediments have been taken from Wilkes and Thala Valley tip, with control sites at Robinsons Ridge and Jacks Donga. 50 marine sediments have been taken from the bay offshore from Thala Valley tip. 116 fresh and marine waters have been taken from the fresh water stream flowing through the Thala Valley tip, the tip/sea interface, and the nearshore marine offshore from Thala Valley tip and control sites. Formal integration of these data into a GIS is underway. These data have not been archived until 2012, hence the only data available were sourced from publications arising from the project.