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inlandWaters

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  • AM04 borehole drilled January 2006. A single current meter data dip was collected during routine CTD operations over a period of 4 days upon completion of borehole. Consult Readme file for detail of data files and formats.

  • AM05 borehole drilled December 2009. See the pdf file as part of the download for more information on the work carried out as part of this borehole.

  • AM06 borehole drilled January 2010. See the pdf file as part of the download for more information on the work carried out as part of this borehole.

  • AM03 borehole drilled December 2005. Current meter data dips collected during routine CTD operations over a period of 4 days upon completion of borehole. Consult Readme file for detail of data files and formats.

  • AM01 borehole drilled January 2002 at a height of 65 metres above sea level. Current meter data dips collected during routine CTD operations over a period of 4 days upon completion of borehole. Consult Readme file for detail of data files and formats.

  • This is a scanned copy of the report of sediment core activities at Davis Station, 1985 by Lin Jian-ping. Paraphrased from the abstract of the report: Sediment deposited in the bottom of water provide a historical record of the biological and chemical changes which have occurred in the places since they were formed. One of the research programs at Davis in 1985 was the sediment coring program. Sediment cores were taken from some places of the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica, and were analysed for water content, total organic content and non-polar lipid content.

  • Water depth measurements were taken in Long Fjord during early winter in 2007. The measurements were collected by Graham Cook, station leader at Davis Station in the Australian Antarctic Territory. The measurements were made by dropping a weighted line off the back of a quad bike, after drilling a hole through the sea ice. Measurements were made approximately every 100 metres. The download file contains a csv spreadsheet which lists each waypoint, plus the corresponding water depth and any comments. The text file contains the waypoint information collected by the Garmin GPS unit. Data in the text file are comma separated and are interpreted as follows: WP,D,001 (waypoint) , -68.51341000, 78.06903000,(Latitude and Longitude) 05/25/2007, 10:25:35, (Date and time Downloaded to Computer) 24-MAY-07 11:40:42 (Date and time of reading). Time is in local time. Vegetation was found on the weight that we used when we first started at the seaward end of the Fjord and then again in shallow water between Brookes Hut and a small island 800 or 900 metres out from Brookes. The weight is quite smooth and does not pick up a lot. The reference given below provides some further information about previously collected bathymetry data in Long Fjord. Furthermore, also see the metadata records: 'Bathymetric data of Long and Tryne Fjords at Vestfold Hills, Antarctica, collected in December 1999 [VH_bathy_99]' 'Interpolated bathymetry of Long and Tryne Fjords, Vestfold Hills, Antarctica [long_tryne_bathy]' The fields in this dataset are: Waypoint Latitude Longitude Water Depth Date Time

  • AM01b borehole drilled December 2003. Current meter data dip collected during routine CTD profiling over a period of 1 day upon completion of borehole. Consult Readme file for detail of data files and formats.

  • AM03 borehole drilled December 2005. Profiling measurements conducted to test borehole diameter integrity.

  • 1.The lakes and ponds in the Larsemann Hills and Bolingen Islands (East-Antarctica) are characterised by cyanobacteria-dominated, benthic microbial mat communities. A 56-lake dataset representing the limnological diversity among the more than 150 lakes and ponds in the region was developed to identify the nature and quantify the effects of the abiotic conditions structuring the cyanobacterial and diatom communities. 2.Limnological diversity in the lakes of the Larsemann Hills and Bolingen Islands is primarily determined by salinity and salinity related variables (concentrations of major ions, conductivity and alkalinity), and variation in lake morphometry (depth, catchment and lake area). Low pigment, phosphate and nitrogen concentrations, and DOC and TOC levels in the water column of most lakes underscore the ecological success of benthic microbial mats in this region. 3.Benthic communities consisted of prostrate, sometimes finely laminated mats, flake mats, epilithic and interstitial microbial mats. Mat physiognomy and chlorophyll/carotenoid ratios were strongly related to lake depth, but not to salinity. 4.Morphological-taxonomic analyses revealed the presence of 27 diatom morphospecies and 34 cyanobacterial morphotypes. Mats of shallow lakes (interstitial and flake mats) and those of deeper lakes (prostrate mats) were characterized by different dominant cyanobacterial morphotypes. No relationship was found between the distribution of these morphotypes and salinity. In contrast, variation in diatom species composition was strongly related to both lake depth and salinity. Shallow ponds are mainly characterised by aerial diatoms (e.g. Diadesmis cf. perpusilla and Hantzschia spp.). In deep lakes, communities are dominated by Psammothidium abundans and Stauroforma inermis. Lakes with conductivities higher than 1.5 mS/cm become susceptible to freezing out of salts and hence pronounced salinity fluctuations. In these lakes Psammothidium abundans and Stauroforma inermis are replaced by Amphora veneta. Stomatocysts were only important in shallow freshwater lakes. 5.Ice cover influences microbial mat structure and composition both directly by physical disturbance in shallow lakes and by influencing light availability in deeper lakes, as well as indirectly by generating salinity increases and promoting the development of seasonal anoxia. 6.The relationship between diatom species composition and salinity and depth is statistically significant. Transfer functions based on these data can therefore be used in paleolimnological reconstruction to infer changes in the precipitation-evaporation balance in continental Antarctic lakes. These data were also collected under the auspices of the Micromat Project, Biodiversity of Microbial mats in Antarctica (see the URL below). The fields in this dataset are: Lake Lake number Location Latitude Longitude Altitude (m) Area (ha) Catchment (ha) Depth (m) Distance from Plateau Distance from Sea Geology Substrate Presence Absence pH Alkalinity Nitrate Nitrite Ammonium Silicate Phosphate Oxygen Salinity Turbidity Conductivity Sodium Potassium Calcium Magnesium Chlorine Sulphur Bicarbonate Hydrocarbonate Total Organic Carbon Dissolved Organic Carbon