Keyword

EARTH SCIENCE > CRYOSPHERE > SNOW/ICE > ICE DEPTH/THICKNESS

26 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
From 1 - 10 / 26
  • This dataset contains records of ice thickness and snow thickness from Casey, Antarctica. Measurements were attempted on a weekly basis and were recorded between 1979 and 1992. The observations are not continuous however. The dataset is available via the provided URL. This data were also collected as part of ASAC projects 189 and 741. The Casey fast ice thickness data are no longer being collected.

  • This dataset contains records of ice thickness and snow thickness from Davis Antarctica. Measurements were attempted on a weekly basis and have been recorded since 1957 and are ongoing, although data have only been archived here until 2002. The observations are not continuous however. The dataset is available via the provided URL. This data were also collected as part of ASAC projects 189 and 741. Logbook(s): Glaciology Davis Sea Ice Logs 1992-1999

  • AM03 borehole drilled December 2005. Profiling measurements conducted to test borehole diameter integrity.

  • Motivation: One of the characteristics of this voyage is that we have long ice stations which last for a few days. Taking this opportunity, we decided to examine the diurnal change of snow properties at the fixed snow pit site. Since this measurement was not included in the original plan, Time interval was a bit variable from 3 hours to 5 hours depending on the progress of the other work. Observation items: Snow thickness, Temperature profile (every 3 cm), Grain size, Grain shape, Snow density, Hardness, Salinity Instruments: Folding scales, Spatula, Thermometer, Snow sampler, Magnifying glass, Salinometer Information pertaining to the dataset: Time - recorded in local time Hs - snow depth in cm Cloud measurements - oktas Water level - distance between snow surface and surface seawater in cm Depth - depth of the individual layer referenced to snow/ice interface (upper column) or snow surface (lower column) in cm Ta - air temperature in degrees celsius DH, FC, PP, DF, RG stand for Depth hoar, Faceted crystals, Precipitation particles, Decomposing and fragemented precipitation particles, Rounded grains - according to "The International Classification for Seasonal Snow on the Ground" (Colbeck et al., 1990). Weight - g Mid-depth - cm

  • AM03 borehole drilled December 2005. Consult Readme file for detail of data files and formats. 2011-2012 data may be final data from the unit owing to battery failure. The original project for this dataset was ASAC 1164, but recent data fall under the auspices of project AAS 4096.

  • This dataset contains routine measurements of snow and ice thickness, and snow-ice interface temperature, at 1m intervals along standard transects; snow property characterisation in snow pits measured at 0m, 50m and 100m along the transects; and sea ice cores acquired at various locations both along the transects and elsewhere on ice station floes during the 2012 SIPEX 2 marine science voyage. Ice temperature information is acquired from the cores, which are taken on-board for further analysis. The latter includes thin-section analysis of sea-ice stratigraphy and crystallography at -20C within the freezer lab on-board the ship. The cores are then cut up into 5cm sections and melted for analysis of salinity and stable oxygen isotopes. Observation items: Snow: - Thickness - Temperature profile (every 3 cm) - Snow-ice interface temperature at 1m intervals along the 100m transects - Grain size - Grain shape - Density - Hardness - Salinity - Stable oxygen isotope Ice: - Thickness - Freeboard - Draft - Temperature - Salinity - Stable oxygen isotope - Crystallography and texture - Density Instruments: Snow: Folding scales, Spatula, Thermometer, Snow sampler, Magnifying glass, Salinometer, Temperature and thickness probes, scales Ice: Drills, corers, ice-thickness tape measures, thermometer, salinometer, band-saw, cross-polarising filter, scales The data are recorded in log books (scanned copies are included in this dataset) and have been transferred into the standard AAD sea-ice database templates (in excel format) for each station.

  • Ocean circulation beneath ice shelves and associated rates of melting and freezing are influenced strongly by water column thickness and depth. The shape of the cavity beneath the Amery Ice Shelf is important for our understanding of ice shelf stability and freshwater input to the ocean and their dependence on climate. New seismic surveys of the centre region of the Amery Ice Shelf and ice-draft data taken at the grounding line has provided a considerable amount of new water-column thickness and bathymetry data. The data is adjusted in the unknown region south of 71 degrees 35 minutes S by comparing the complex error between simulated tides against in situ GPS observations. A finite element, hydrodynamic ocean tide model is used to simulate the 4 major constituents (S2, M2, K1 and O1). The new data differs from a previous bathymetry map in a number of places. Significantly, there is channel that leads from the Prydz bay depression into the deepest part of the AIS cavity in the south through a series of depressions. This technique has particular application when the water column beneath ice shelves is inaccessible and in situ GPS data is available.

  • AM06 borehole drilled January 2010. Profiling measurements conducted to test borehole diameter integrity.

  • AM04 borehole drilled January 2006. Profiling measurements conducted to test borehole diameter integrity.

  • AM04 borehole drilled January 2006. Annual data retrieved for 2006, and 2007. Consult Readme file for detail of data files and formats. New data for 2011 was added in November of 2011.