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    [This data has been superseded by a synthesised global dataset which includes additional ecological data contributed by non-RLS entities (National Reef Monitoring Network). Please visit the corresponding NRMN Collection (IMOS - National Reef Monitoring Network Sub-Facility - Global off-transect species observations || Global reef fish abundance and biomass) for the most current version of this data. See "Downloads and Links" section below.] This dataset contains records of bony fishes and elasmobranchs collected by Reef Life Survey (RLS) divers along 50m transects on shallow rocky and coral reefs, worldwide. Abundance information is available for all records found within quantitative survey limits (50 x 5 m swathes during a single swim either side of the transect line, each distinguished as a Block), and out-of-survey records are identified as presence-only (Method 0). Although surveys are undertaken as part of monitoring programs at particular locations (mostly in Australia), this dataset contains does not include repeat surveys of sites.

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    [This data has been superseded by a synthesised global dataset which includes additional ecological data contributed by non-RLS entities (National Reef Monitoring Network). Please visit the corresponding NRMN Collection (IMOS - National Reef Monitoring Network Sub-Facility - Global cryptobenthic fish abundance) for the most current version of this data. See "Downloads and Links" section below.] Reef Life Survey is designed to develop and resource a network of skilled recreational divers for rapid and cost-effective assessment of the state of the inshore marine environment at the global scale. The project uses standardised underwater visual census methods employed by trained SCUBA divers to survey fish and invertebrate species and to record habitat type using photo quadrats - this dataset refers to the cryptic fish and invertebrate survey component only.

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    Gillnet fishing trials at a number of sites off the east coast of Tasmania have been undertaken to collect samples of the banded morwong, which are characterised based on size, age, maturity stage and sex structure. Otoliths are sectioned for age determination. The dataset comprises a major component of work carried out from the beginning of 2001 and available historic data (1995 to 2000) have also been uploaded into this database to provide a complete dataset. See attached reports for further information.

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    The data is quantitative abundance of fish, megafaunal invertebrates and percent algal cover derived from underwater visual census methods involving transect counts at rocky reef sites around Tasmania. This dataset allows examination of changes in Tasmanian shallow reef faunal and floral communities over a decadal scale, with initial surveys conducted in 1992-1995, and again in 2006-2007. There are plans for ongoing surveys. An additional component was added in the latter study - a boat ramp study looking at the proximity of boat ramps and their effects of fishing. We analysed underwater visual census data on fishes and macroinvertebrates (abalone and rock lobsters) at 133 shallow rocky reef sites around Tasmania that ranged from 0.6 - 131 km from the nearest boat ramp. These sites were not all the same as those used for the comparison of 1994 and 2006 reef communities. The subset of 133 sites examined in this component consisted of only those sites that were characterized by the two major algal (kelp) types (laminarian or fucoid dominated). Sites with atypical algal assemblages were omitted from the 196 sites surveyed in 2006. This study aimed to examine reef community data for changes at the community level, changes in species richness and introduced species populations, and changes that may have resulted from ocean warming and fishing. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. The underwater visual census (UVC) methodology used to survey rocky reef communities was designed to maximise detection of (i) changes in population numbers and size-structure (ii) cascading ecosystem effects associated with disturbances such as fishing, (iii) long term change and variability in reef assemblages.

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    In fishing trials, the short term survival rates for hook caught flathead (Platycephalus bassensis in Tasmania and P. fuscus in Queensland) were examined to determine critical factors affecting post-release survival. Biological information (size) and hooking location/damage were recorded and fish held for several days in aquaria to assess survival rates. In order to relate hooking location and catch rates for a range of hook types (including circle hooks) structured fishing trials and volunteer fishers (using a diary system) provided information on fish size, hook type and hooking location.

  • A series of 6 sets of midwater trawls in Prydz Bay. Each trawl set took place over a 24 hour period to test the extent of diurnal vertical migration in P. antarcticum. Part of the KROCK cruise of Aurora Australis. These data have been incorporated into an 'historical fish database' available for download at the URL given below (Access Database). These data have also been included in the Australian Antarctic Data Centre's Biodiversity database, and have been submitted to GBIF and OBIS (Global Biodiversity Information Facility, and Ocean Biogeographic Information System). The fields in this dataset are: Species Cruise Start Date End Date Sampling Date Vessel Name Fishing Area Latitude Longitude Gear Length Weight Sex Gonad Weight Stomach Weight

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    A project investigating the restoration of string kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) habitat on Tasmania's east and south coasts. Macroalgae, fish and invertebrate counts were collected as part of the project using the Edgar Barrett transect technique in the Derwent Estuary and in the Mercury Passage on the South East Tasmania. Other fish, invertebrate and macroalgal data was also collected.

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    [This data has been superseded by a synthesised global dataset which includes additional ecological data contributed by non-RLS entities (National Reef Monitoring Network). Please visit the corresponding NRMN Collection (IMOS - National Reef Monitoring Network Sub-Facility - Global mobile macroinvertebrate abundance) for the most current version of this data. See "Downloads and Links" section below.] Reef Life Survey is designed to develop and resource a network of skilled recreational divers for rapid and cost-effective assessment of the state of the inshore marine environment at the global scale. The project uses standardised underwater visual census methods employed by trained SCUBA divers to survey fish and invertebrate species and to record habitat type using photo quadrats - this dataset refers to the cryptic fish and invertebrate survey component only.

  • From the abstract of the referenced paper: One hundred and sixty four plastic particles (mean length 4.1 mm) recovered from the scats of fur seals (Arctocephalus spp.) on Macquarie Island were examined. Electron micrographs of 41 of the plastic particles showed that none could be identified as plastic pellet feedstock from their shapes. Commonly, such pellets are cylindrical and spherical. Instead, all the 164 plastic particles from the seal scats were angular particles of 7 colors (feedstock particles are normally opaque or white) and could be classified into 2 categories: i) fragmented along crystal lines and likely to be the result of UV breakdown; and ii) worn by abrasion (where striations were clearly visible) into irregular shapes with rounded corners. White, brown, green, yellow and blue were the most common colors. In composition, they came from 5 polymer groups; polyethylene 93%, polypropylene 4%, poly(1-Cl-1-butenylene) polychloroprene 2%, melamine-urea (phenol) (formaldehyde) resin 0.5%, and cellulose (rope fiber) 0.5%. The larger groups are buoyant with a specific gravity less than that of seawater. These small plastic particles are formed from the breakdown of larger particles (fragments). Their origin seems to be from the breakdown of user plastics washed ashore and ground down on cobbled beaches. Certainly most particles (70%) had attained their final form by active abrasion. It is hypothesized that the plastic particles were washed out to sea and then selected by size and consumed by individuals of a pelagic fish species, Electrona subaspera, who in turn were consumed by the fur seals. Thus, the particles were accumulated both by the fish and the seals in the usual process of their feeding. The download file contains a pdf of the paper listed in the reference section below, as well as 48 scanning electron micrograph images of plastics recovered from fur seal scats.

  • SAZ photos of sediment trap samples Sediment traps are cones which intercept and store falling marine particles in collection cups. The particles consist of a range of material including phytoplankton, zooplankton, faecal pellets, and dust. Each trap collects a time series of samples. The sediment traps are from deep moorings in the Southern Ocean, typically at 47S, 54S, and 61S and at around 140 degrees East. Each mooring typically has 2-3 traps between 800m and 3800m below sea-level. The samples are size fractionated into less than 1mm and greater than 1mm fractions using a 1mm sieve. Various chemical analyses and observations have been made on the less than 1mm fraction. These are photos are of greater than 1mm fraction, mainly showing 'swimmers.' Photos are mostly taken on the sieve, so the grid is 1mm for scale. Sample identification is in the file name, and also in a label in the photo. The file name format is: Typical example s02_54_800_04.jpg 1) s02: s is for SAZ. Collection season number is first year of collection season. So s02 is from SAZ 2002-2003. 2) 54: Nominal latitude. 3) 800: Nominal depth, m. 4) 04: Cup number, typically 1-21 or 1-13, single digit numbers padded with a zero to help operating systems display files in order. 5) .jpg: All photos are in jpeg format Some files have additional information at end, examples below: * FP: faecal pellet * begin and end: beginning and end of sieving process. Mostly to show faecal pellets at start that are rinsed through sieve. This work was completed as part of ASAC project 1156 (ASAC_1156). See also the metadata record 'Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) Sediment Trap Moorings' (SAZOTS).