From 1 - 10 / 149
  • Please also see the child records of this project for access to data. Attached to this record are the originally supplied datasets for 1997-1998, and also summary files and mooring diagrams supplied in 2012. Taken from the 2008-2009 Progress Report: Progress against objectives: The key to advancing the objective of understanding ocean processes controlling uptake of atmospheric CO2 is the ability to deploy moored autonomous samplers and sensors in Southern Ocean surface waters capable of quantifying seasonal cycles in biological and biogeochemical processes. Our effort in the last 12 months has focused on development of a robust mooring platform to carry these devices. We deployed two different engineering test designs, known as Pulse 5 Heavy and Pulse 5 Light. Both designs survived 6 months in the sea, including wave heights up to 12 meters, while transmitting mooring tensions, mooring accelerations, and GPS positions live to the internet (www.imos.org.au). Following this success we are preparing to deploy the next version of Pulse with scientific instruments to measure temperature, salinity, oxygen, and phytoplankton fluorescence. In addition we deployed a deep ocean mooring with time-series sediment traps to quantify sinking particle fluxes, and in-situ settling columns to determine particle sinking rates. Taken from the 2009/2010 Progress Report: Progress against objectives: Two voyages were awarded by the Australian Marine National Facility to use RV Southern Surveyor to service these Southern Ocean Time Series (SOTS) moorings in the 2009/10 season, and for this reason the shiptime awarded to this project by AAS was not needed and was relinquished. This arrangement will continue in 2010/11 for which the MNF has again awarded two voyages in September 2010 and April 2011. The fieldwork in 2009/10 was very successful: i) the SAZ deep sediment trap mooring was recovered in September 2009 and redeployed for recovery in September 2010. ii) the PULSE biogeochemistry mooring was deployed in September 2009 and functioned beautifully prior to recovery in March 2010 for servicing. It will be redeployed in September 2010. iii) the SOFS Southern Ocean Flux Station mooring was completed and deployed in March 2010 for recovery in April 2011, and redeployment in September 2011.

  • Metadata record for data from ASAC Project 2519 See the link below for public details on this project. This dataset comprises of floating buoy data collected as part of the ARGO program. All of the data are automatically uploaded to the main ARGO data centre, and can be accessed from there (via the provided URL). Above the map of current float locations on this web page, there are buttons to allow you to access an interactive map, search for floats, and access the data. The Argo floats are programmed to measure temperature and salinity profiles from 2000m to the sea surface every 10 days. When they surface they transmit the profile data, their location, and various engineering parameters to satellite. The data ares put on the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) and are available within 24 hours. Global data centres in the USA and France receive the raw data from the country of origin and also update the data when quality control is performed. Some floats measure other data in addition to temperature and salinity. Dissolved oxygen and current velocity are two other parameters that are measured by a few floats. See the ARGO website for further details about each float (information can be accessed using the WMO (World Meteorological Organisation) numbers provided in the download file). The fields in this dataset are: Launch Date Latitude Longitude ARGO Number WMO Number Webb Number Deployment Order Number More information about the dataset is provided in a readme file as part of the download. Data were last updated in early May, 2014.

  • A Lambert Glacier - Amery Ice Shelf series of airborne (Squirrel helicopter and Twin Otter fixed wing) RES and surface elevation profiles were conducted over two summer seasons; 1988/89 and 1989/90. Altogether nearly 10,000 km of various flight paths were undertaken, operating out of Mawson (67.60 S, 62.88 E), Davis (68.58 S, 77.97 E), Dovers (70.22 S, 65.87 E) or Beaver Lake (70.80 S, 68.18 E). More information can be found at the BEDMAP website. The fields in this dataset are: mission_id (unique mission identifier) latitude (decimal degrees) longitude (decimal degrees) ice_thickness (m) surface_elevation (m) water_column_thickness (m) bed_elevation (m)

  • Digital Elevation Model of the Amery Ice Shelf derived from ERS satellite radar altimetry elevation data. Generated on a 1-km polar stereographic grid using kriging in four sections by Helen Amanda Phillips, Antarctic CRC/IASOS. Three files are available for download: Amery Ice Shelf DEM from satellite altimeter data version relative to WGS-84 ellipsoid, Amery Ice Shelf DEM from satellite altimeter data version relative to EGM96 geoid, A thickness dataset that was derived from the AIS-DEM. Each file constitutes 122,385 lines of data (+ 4 lines of header information). The fields in this dataset are: Latitude Longitude Geodial Height in metres above sea level (WGS-84 and EGM-96) Thickness

  • This dataset contains the locations of sampling sites for ASAC project 40 on rotation 3 of the French polar supply ship L'Astrolabe in the 2003/2004 season. Samples were collected between February and March of 2004. It also contains the final dataset which has information on chlorophyll, carotenoids, coccolithophorids and species identification and counts. Public Summary from the project: This program aims to determine the role of single celled plants, animals, bacteria and viruses in Antarctic waters. We quantify their vital role as food for other organisms, their potential influence in moderating global climate change through absorption of CO2 and production of DMS, and determine their response to effect of climate change. For more information, see the other metadata records related to ASAC project 40 (ASAC_40). The fields in this dataset are: Tube Labelour use Sample#our use Date(UTC) Time(UTC)Shorthand entry code - ignore Time(UTC)FormattedUse this Long Degdegrees Long Minminutes LongDecdecimaldegrees Lat Degdegrees Lat Minminutes LatDecdecimaldegrees Local time (dec hrs)actual solar local time (decimal hours) calc from longitude DOES NOT EQUAL TIME ZONE Sea Temp Icepresent/absent Lugol's#microscope sample number for phytoplankton ID (Our use only) HPLC Volvolume filtered for HPLC pigment analysis (Our use only) Cocco Volvolume filtered for coccolithophorid counts (Our use only) Cocco tray No.(Our use only) Location:DCM: Deep chlorophyll maximum Thermo: Thermocline

  • Cores from lakes and the shallow marine were taken for investigation of palaeoclimate through proxies such as grain size, TOC, C:N:S and diatoms. The cores have been 14-C dated with some sheel fragments having been analysed using Amino Acid geochronology. The full postglacial record, plus till and pre-glacial sediments, were recovered from two marine cores at 10.3 and 12 m depth in the sediment respectively. These cores are presently (2000) being analysed. Contact the Chief Investgator for queries about these samples or the project, ASAC1071 - 'Palaeoenvironments of the East Antarctic coast between 50E and 120E'. The fields in this dataset are: core number station-employ lake/marine basin latitude longitude water depth (m) date gear recovery (cm) liner (cm) potsdam storage

  • Antarctic lake cores record a history of precipitation in the preservation of climate sensitive microbial communities. Comprehensive integration of our precipitation records with other climate proxies such as ice core temperature records and historical climate data are dependent upon accurate dating of this lake sediment. Fourteen lakes and ponds of the Windmill Islands were sampled in 1998 for diatoms and in 1999 for water chemistry. The waterbodies included in this study fall into one of 3 broad categories: saline lake (greater than 5m deep; greater than, or equal to, 3 parts per thousand - salinity), saline pond (less than 5m deep; greater than, or equal to, 3 parts per thousand - salinity) or freshwater pond (less than 5m deep; less than 3 parts per thousand - salinity). Saline Lakes Beall Lake, the largest lake on Beall Island, is situated in a rocky catchment with evidence of breeding penguin pairs nearby. Outflow into the small lake on the northwestern point of Beall Lake occurs at elevated lake levels. Holl Lake, the largest lake on Holl Island, is contained by ridges to the NE and SW with an obvious outflow to the SE. At the time of sampling (20 Dec 1998), penguin feathers were observed in the sediment. In 2001 large numbers of penguins were observed behind the NE ridge in addition to the numerous skuas nesting on most nearby peaks. Lake A is the westernmost lake on Browning Peninsula. This large closed saline lake has a very thick ice cover (~2.5 m) and very little evidence of birdlife. Lake M is the easternmost lake sampled on Browning Peninsula. This large closed saline lake had a very thick ice cover (3.0 m) at the time of sampling. Saline Ponds Lake Warrington is the largest waterbody on Warrington Island. Found in the centre of Warrington Island, this small shallow (1.9 m) saline pond was almost completely frozen (ice cover of 1.6 m), with ca. 0.3 m of water below the ice at the time of sampling. The lake catchment is muddy with runoff towards Robertson Channel (to the NE) and the ice cover showed signs of sediment entrapment giving a gritty texture. Lake G is located on northeastern Peterson Island. This very saline (greater than 60 ppt) shallow (1.0 m) pond was almost completely frozen (ice cover of 0.8 m), with ca. 0.1 m of water below the ice at the time of sampling. Lake G is close to breeding penguin sites and there was a noticeable discolouration of the surface water at the time of sampling. Lake I is the easternmost of the three sites visited on southern Peterson Island. This shallow (0.3 m) saline pond is very close to breeding penguin sites and was sampled by hand as the ice cover (0.1 m) was almost as thick as the lake depth. Lake K is approx. 400 m to the west of Lake I on central southern Peterson Island. This completely frozen saline pond is also very close to breeding penguin sites. Lake L is the southernmost pond sampled on Peterson Island. This almost completely frozen shallow (~0.8 m/0.8 m ice cover) saline pond is very close to breeding penguin sites with noticeable discolouration of the top ca. 0.2 - 0.3 m of water at the time of sampling. Freshwater Ponds Lake B, a shallow (0.9 m) freshwater pond, is located on the western side of Browning Peninsula, approx. 500 m to the south of Lake A. Lake C is a shallow (1.0 m) freshwater pond in the central valley of Browning Peninsula. Lake D is a shallow (0.5 m) freshwater pond in the central valley of Browning Peninsula approx. 500 m to the north of Lake C. This lake was sampled by hand as the ice cover (~0.5 m) was almost as thick as the lake depth. Lake E is a shallow (3.1 m) freshwater pond in the central valley of Browning Peninsula approx. 250 m to the north of Lake D. Lake F is the northernmost pond sampled from the central valley of Browning Peninsula. This freshwater pond is approx. 500 m to the north-west of Lake E. The sediment/species samples were collected in November and December 1998, the water samples were collected in December 1999. The fields in this dataset are: Lake Name Code Location Latitude Longitude Lake Depth Ice Depth Water Sample Salinity Lake Area Catchment Elevation Nitrite Nitrate Silicon Phosphate pH Species The numbers given in the species spreadsheet are for percentage abundance, ie the relative abundance of each species in the community.

  • This dataset contains locations of sampling sites for ASAC project 40 on rotation 4 of the French polar supply ship L'Astrolabe in the 2007/2008 season. Samples were collected between February and March of 2008. It also contains information on chlorophyll, carotenoids, coccolithophorids and species identification and counts. Public Summary from the project: This program aims to determine the role of single celled plants, animals, bacteria and viruses in Antarctic waters. We quantify their vital role as food for other organisms, their potential influence in moderating global climate change through absorption of CO2 and production of DMS, and determine their response to effect of climate change. For more information, see the other metadata records related to ASAC project 40 (ASAC_40). The fields in this dataset are: Tube label Date(UTC) Time(UTC) Local time (dec hrs)actual solar local time (decimal hours) calc from longitude DOES NOT EQUAL TIME ZONE Longitude decimal degrees/degrees, minutes Latitude decimal degrees/degrees, minutes Sea Temperature degrees Celsius Ice present/absent Lugol's bottle # - microscope sample number for phytoplankton ID (Our use only) HPLC Volume remaining - volume filtered for HPLC pigment analysis (Our use only) Volume filtered for HPLC Volume remaining for Coccoliths Coccolith tray No.(Our use only) Coccolith tray position number Net Sample Time Fluorescence

  • This dataset contains the locations of sampling sites for ASAC project 40 on rotation 2 of the French polar supply ship L'Astrolabe in the 2005/2006 season. Samples were collected between December 2005 and January of 2006. It also contains the final dataset which has information on chlorophyll, carotenoids, coccolithophorids and species identification and counts. Public Summary from the project: This program aims to determine the role of single celled plants, animals, bacteria and viruses in Antarctic waters. We quantify their vital role as food for other organisms, their potential influence in moderating global climate change through absorption of CO2 and production of DMS, and determine their response to effect of climate change. For more information, see the other metadata records related to ASAC project 40 (ASAC_40).

  • This dataset contains the locations of sampling sites for ASAC project 40 on rotation 1 of the French polar supply ship L'Astrolabe in the 2003/2004 season. Samples were collected between December and January of 2003/2004. It also contains the final dataset which has information on chlorophyll, carotenoids, coccolithophorids and species identification and counts. Public Summary from the project: This program aims to determine the role of single celled plants, animals, bacteria and viruses in Antarctic waters. We quantify their vital role as food for other organisms, their potential influence in moderating global climate change through absorption of CO2 and production of DMS, and determine their response to effect of climate change. For more information, see the other metadata records related to ASAC project 40 (ASAC_40). The fields in this dataset are: Tube Labelour use Sample#our use Date(UTC) Time(UTC)Shorthand entry code - ignore Time(UTC)Formatted Use this Long Degdegrees Long Minminutes Long Decdecimaldegrees Lat Degdegrees Lat Minminutes Lat Decdecimaldegrees Local time (dec hrs)actual solar local time (decimal hours) calc from longitude DOES NOT EQUAL TIME ZONE Sea Temp Icepresent/absent Lugol's#microscope sample number for phytoplankton ID (Our use only) HPLC Volvolume filtered for HPLC pigment analysis (Our use only) Cocco Volvolume filtered for coccolithophorid counts (Our use only) Cocco tray No.(Our use only) Location:DCM: Deep chlorophyll maximum Thermo: Thermocline Pigments