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  • This file contains a report of biological field work undertaken in the Casey region during 1976. It includes work done on seals and seabirds. The hard copy of the log has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • Taken from the report prepared by R Kenny: In this report our comparatively brief knowledge of the Elephant Seal at Macquarie Island (based only on one year's observations) have been augmented by abstracting notes from "The Natural History of the Elephant Seal" by L. Harrison Matthews Discovery Reports, vol. 1 p. 233. 1929., based on observations at South Georgia. The Elephant Seal herds at the two islands are comparable - at South Georgia the animals had been overfished almost to the point of extinction by 1885, but were then not hunted for many years, and by 1929 had "increased in numbers till at the present time they are probably as numerous as ever", and are now fished under Government regulation to prevent extermination; the Macquarie Island herd has a similar history.

  • This file contains a report from Wilkes station in 1968 detailing the numbers of seals killed for dog food. The seals killed were primarily Weddell seals, but some information about leopard, crabeater and elephant seals is also provided. The file also contains some information on the Weddell seal population off Herring Island in 1972. The hard copy of the file has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • This file contains a log of observations collected in the Casey region between 1972 and 1973. Observations were made of Seals (Weddell seals, Elephant seals, Leopard seals) and Adelie penguins. The hard copy of the log has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • This log contains notes and observations of many biological species from the Mawson and Davis areas, collected between 1954 and 1960. Species include, Crabeater Seals, Weddell Seals, Ross Seals, Leopard Seals, Elephant Seals, Adelie Penguins, Emperor Penguins and Skuas. The hard copy of the log has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • Metadata record for data from ASAC Project 2753 See the link below for public details on this project. Public Weddell and southern elephant seals are high-order predators living in the Antarctic marine ecosystem. Their place in that ecosystem is the result of a long history of evolutionary adaptation to a challenging and changing environment. The objective of this study is to understand how Weddell and elephant seals have adapted and are responding to today's rapidly changing Antarctic environment. This study will use current and innovative approaches in demographic (population) analyses and diet techniques to analyse changes in the seals' demographic parameters and historical aspects of their ecology. Project objectives: Objective 1. Seek a greater understanding of the links between climate based environmental parameters and Weddell seal demographic performance. Objective 2. Test the hypothesis that the foraging ecology and presence of male southern elephant seals hauling out along the Antarctic coast are regulated by variation in the extent and concentration of coastal sea-ice. Objective 3. Examine contemporary and historical dietary shifts in an Antarctic marine predator by using a non-invasive technique, stable isotope analyses. Objective 4. Construct models of potential population performance for Weddell and southern elephant seals with predicted climate change Taken from the 2008-2009 Progress Report: Progress against objectives: The first season of field work was conducted at Casey in December 2008. This comprised of surveys of the region to locate breeding and moulting haulouts, weighing and flipper tagging of Weddell seal pups and flipper tagging of sub adult elephant seals. Specifically: Tagging Leptonychotes weddellii. A total of 30 pups were flipper tagged. Tagging: 46 sub-adult male Mirounga leonina in Browning Peninsula region. Aerial survey of the Casey fast-ice conducted on 30/1/2009. Conducted at 1000, 500, 300 ft. A total of 33 seals counted. Taken from the 2009-2010 Progress Report: Progress against objectives: 1. Observations of tagged Weddell seals made in the Vestfold Hills during the breeding season. 2. Counts were made of elephant seals at Davis station 3. No progress made due to postponement of project at Casey 4. Data collected on Weddell and elephant seals at Davis. No modelling undertaken in this year

  • Stereoscopic images of elephant seals at Atlas Cove, taken at Heard Island on 16-17 December 2008. The Aurora Australis made a brief visit to Heard and McDonald Islands in mid-December 2008. The visit was opportunistic owing to an opening in the ship's schedule. During the visit a number of quick surveys were undertaken, primarily assisted by helicopters. This dataset consists of stereographic images taken by two photographers from ground level during a survey of Elephant Seal colonies at Atlas Cove. There are two folders of data, one for each photographer. Each folder contains a shot list of the photos (in an excel spreadsheet), plus the photos themselves.

  • This log contains notes and observations of whales and seals at Mawson, collected between 1979 and 1984. Included animals are Minke Whales, Killer Whales, Leopard Seals, Elephant Seals, Crabeater Seals and Fur Seals. Locations include Horseshoe Harbour, Welch Island and Giganteus Island. The hard copy of the log has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • This is a copy of a scanned document which contains a report, as well as tabulated data compiled by K. Brown on Sea Elephants (Elephant Seals) at Heard Island in 1951. The data are biological in nature, and deal with: Breeding Season 1951 Formation of the Harems Arrival of the Bulls Arrival of the Cows Birth of the Pups Lactation Moult Pup Mortality Fertilisation of the Cows Break up of the Harems Arrival of the Adolescents

  • This file contains a log of biological observations made in the Davis region during 1960. It includes information on Elephant Seals, Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals, Adelie Penguins, Emperor Penguins, Skuas, Silver-Grey Petrels, Antarctic Petrels, Cape Pigeons, Snow Petrels, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Giant Petrels and Whales The hard copy of the log has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.