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EARTH SCIENCE > BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION > ANIMALS/VERTEBRATES > BIRDS

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  • The dataset contains boundaries of nest areas of surface nesting flying seabirds at numerous breeding sites across Prydz Bay, Antarctica. The sites are at islands in the Rauer Group, the Svenner Islands and two islands (Bluff Island and Gardner Island) off the Vestfold Hills. The boundary data were obtained from aerial photos of slopes where flying seabirds had been previously observed. The aerial photos were taken on 1 December 2017. Marcus Salton and Kim Kliska conducted the aerial photography and delineated the GIS boundaries representing the nesting areas. The database of potential Adelie penguin breeding habitat as described by the metadata record 'Sites of potential habitat for breeding Adelie penguins in East Antarctica' (http://data.aad.gov.au/metadata/records/AAS_4088_Adelie_Potential_Habitats) was used to associate flying seabird nest areas to a particular island and to structure how the boundaries are stored. The Adelie penguin breeding site database has a unique identifying code for every island in East Antarctica, and the islands are aggregated into spatial sub-groups and then spatial groups. The file structure in which the boundaries are stored has a combination of ‘island’, ‘sub-group’ and ‘spatial group’ (or region) at the top level (eg VES_SG_10 contains all boundaries in spatial group VES (Vestfold Hills and islands) and sub-group 10). Within each sub-group folder are folders for each island where photos were taken (eg IS_72276 is Gardner Island in the VES_SG_10 group). The data is comprised of: (i) a polygon shapefile for each island on which flying bird nest areas were observed; and (ii) a single polygon shapefile for each of Rauer Group, Svenner Islands and Vestfold Hills in which the polygons in (i) are combined. The polygons in the shapefiles have a Type attribute with values ranging from A to E. A = Nests present B = Searched and no nests present C = Nests or salt stains (the investigators were unable to decide whether what they were seeing was nests or salt stains) D = Snow cover E = Not searched

  • This dataset contains the results from surveys of Wandering Albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) on Macquarie Island. The majority of the surveys were conducted at the Caroline Cove colony which contains 59% of the Wandering Albatrosses found on Macquarie Island. Observations were made for 41 consecutive days between 5 December 1975 and 14 January 1976, and for 103 consecutive days between 25 November 1976 and 7 March 1977. Occasional observations were made of birds at other locations on Macquarie Island. Each bird in the colony was banded for identification, sexed and had its plumage scored. The times of arrival and departure, numbers present, interaction and behaviour were observed, and weather conditions were noted irregularly throughout the day. The results are listed in the documentation.

  • Aerial photography (Linhof) of penguin colonies was acquired over the Svenner Islands (Eric Woehler). The penguin colonies were traced, then digitised (John Cox), and saved as DXF-files. Using the ArcView extension 'Register and Transform' (Tom Velthuis), the DXF-files were brought into a GIS and transformed to the appropriate islands.

  • Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme Bird Banding records from the Australian Antarctic Territory and Heard Island, a subset of banding and recovery records from within Australian Antarctic Territory and Heard Island. The Australian Government under the auspices of the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme (ABBBS) manages the collation of information on threatened and migratory bird and bat species. The information provided spans from 1953 to the present, and contains over 2 million records. This set comprises records of banding and recovery in the Australian Antarctic territory. Records are also included if the bird was recovered or banded outside this region. The ABBBS site is at http://www.environment.gov.au/science/bird-and-bat-banding.

  • Aerial photography (Linhof) of penguin colonies was acquired over the Windmill Islands (Eric Woehler). The penguin colonies were traced, then digitised (John Cox), and saved as DXF-files. Using the ArcView extension 'Register and Transform' (Tom Velthuis), The DXF-files were brought into a GIS and transformed to the appropriate islands. Data conforms to SCAR Feature Catalogue which can be searched (refer to link below).

  • This file contains a log of biological observations undertaken at Mawson station between 1982 and 1990. The logs comprise observations of skuas. The hard copy of the log has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • Seabird surveys in January - March 2006 of a poorly known area of the Southern Ocean adjacent to the East Antarctic coast identified six seabird communities, several of which were comparable to seabird communities identified both in adjacent sectors of the Antarctic, and elsewhere in the Southern Ocean. These results support previous proposals that the Southern Ocean seabird community is characterised by an ice-associated assemblage and an open-water assemblage, with the species composition of the assemblages reflecting local (Antarctic-resident) breeding species, and the migratory routes and feeding areas of distant-breeding taxa, respectively. Physical environmental covariates such as sea-ice cover, distance to continental shelf and time of year influenced the distribution and abundance of seabirds observed, but the roles of these factors in the observed spatial and temporal patterns in seabird assemblages was confounded by the duration of the survey. Occurrence of a number of seabird taxa exhibited significant correlations with krill densities at one or two spatial scales, but only three taxa (Arctic tern, snow petrel and dark shearwaters, i.e. sooty and short-tailed shearwaters) showed significant correlations at a range of spatial scales. Dark shearwater abundances showed correlations with krill densities across the range of spatial scales examined. This work was conducted on the BROKE-West voyage of the Aurora Australis.

  • This file contains a report on silver grey petrels in the Windmill Islands in 1961. The report contains hand-drawn maps of Ardery Island, banding information and general information. The data were collected on Ardery Island, Nellie Island and Wilkes Station. The hard copy of the file has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • This file contains a report from Wilkes station in 1968-1969 detailing the banding program undertaken in the Windmill Islands. The document primarily relates to South Polar Skuas, but also mentions Wilson's Storm Petrels, and Snow Petrels. The hard copy of the file has been archived by the Australian Antarctic Division library.

  • Aerial photography (35mm film) of penguin colonies was acquired over some islands north east of Brattstrand Bluff islands (Eric Woehler). The penguin colonies were traced, then digitised (John Cox), and saved as DXF-files. Using the ArcView extension 'Register and Transform' (Tom Velthuis), The DXF-files were brought into a GIS and transformed to the appropriate islands. Update May 2015 - This dataset has been rename from "Brattstrand Bluff penguin GIS dataset" to "Islands NE of Brattstrand Bluff penguin GIS dataset" to better describe the location of the colonies. The penguin colonies are on a small group of islands approximately 12km north east of Brattstrand Bluff. Latitude 69.148 south and longitude 77.268 east. The Data Centre does not have a copy of the original photographs or described GIS data. In May 2015, the Data Centre has attached the following to this record: The DXF file produced by John Cox by digitising the aerial photography. Note this document is not georeferenced. Four photographs taken in 2009 by Barbara Wienecke, Seabird Ecologist, showing penguin colonies on these islands. A shapefile exists of the digitised colonies. The digitising by Ursula Harris, Australian Antarctic Data Centre, was done by georeferencing the DXF drawing over unprocessed Quickbird Image 05NOV15042413-M1BS-052187281010_01_P002. It was done in two parts, the largest island and then the two smaller islands. This allowed for better matching. The accuracy of this data is unknown.