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EARTH SCIENCE > ATMOSPHERE > ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE > SURFACE TEMPERATURE

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  • The current data set contains: Hysplit back-trajectories and IDL reader Trajectories were launched from the SIPEX II ship location every hour at 10m, 500m, 1000m, 1500m, 2000m, 2500m, 3000m, 3500m, 4000m. Three different meteorological reanalyses datasets (ECMWF, GDAS and NCEP were used to generate these 10 day air parcel back-trajectories.

  • Note - these data should be used with caution. The chief investigator for the dataset has indicated that a better quality dataset exists, but the AADC have been unable to attain it for archive. Matlab files containing raw data collected using the program "HC2S3snowwind.CR1" running on Campbell Scientific CR1000 dataloggers. Datalogger "C" was used during all ice stations. On the 8th of October a second mast and logger ("A") were installed on what became the final day of Ice Station 4, and both loggers were deployed at stations 6 and 7, with "C" containing the longer records for each station as it was always installed first and (conditions permitting) left out longer. The sensors on these masts consist of: RM Young "Wind Sentry" Vane and Anemometer set (on top of each mast), no serial numbers Rotronics HC2S3 temperature and relative humidity sensors with standard polyethylene filters Upper sensor, mast "C": s/n 60837541 Lower sensor, mast "C": s/n 60837536 Upper sensor, mast "A": s/n 60837468 Lower sensor, mast "A": s/n 60834204 RM Young "Wind Sentry" anemometers (without vane) at 3 additional elevations on each mast Wenglor YHO3NCT8 photoelectric sensors at 4 heights on each mast. The upper sensor and the third sensor from the top were oriented facing up, while the others faced down. The upper three sensors were purchased in 2012, from a batch of these sensors manufactured in a new Eastern European factory while the lowest sensor on each mast came from a lot purchased in 2007, manufactured in Wenglor's German factory and extensively tested for use in snow. Data contained in these .mat files includes the following variables, with units: Textdates: CSI formatted dates, UTC except for station 2, which was (accidentally) UTC+12 Datenm: Matlab "datenumber", all UTC except for station 2, which is also UTC+12 hours. Battvolt: battery voltage Wptemp: temperature of the Wiring Panel thermister, degrees C Temp 1: air temperature above approximately 50cm, ventilated HC2S3 rotronics sensor, degrees C RH1: relative humidity (WRT water) above approximately 50cm, ventilated HC2S3 rotronics sensor, % Temp 2: air temperature above approximately 200cm, ventilated HC2S3 rotronics sensor, degrees C RH2: relative humidity (WRT water) above 197cm, ventilated HC2S3 rotronics sensor, % Snow1: snow particles per 10second interval at approximately 10cm Snow2: snow particles per 10second interval at approximately 50cm Snow3: snow particles per 10second interval at approximately 100cm Snow4: snow particles per 10second interval at approximately 200cm Wind1: average speed (m/s) at approximately 250cm during 10s interval Wind1max: maximum speed at approximately 250cm during 10s interval Wind2: average speed (m/s) at approximately 100cm during 10s interval Wind2max: maximum speed at approximately 100cm during 10s interval Wind3: average speed (m/s) at approximately 120cm during 10s interval Wind3max: maximum speed at approximately 120cm during 10s interval Wind4: average speed (m/s) at approximately 50cm during 10s interval Wind4max: maximum speed at approximately 50cm during 10s interval WindDir: wind direction at approximately 250cm, degrees, relative to mast orientation (needs correction to true) Measurement heights varied by ice station and by mast being used.

  • This document describes the deployment of five Ice Mass Balance Buoys (IMBs) and two automatic weather stations. These were primarily deployed on floes 2012103 and 20121029, as well as on helicopter flights (refer to buoy metadata for these). IMBs are labelled WHOI-1 to WHOI-6. WHOI-1 was not deployed and WHOI-3 and WHOI-5 failed and were recovered. TAS-2 was exchanged for WHOI-1 Deployments (successful): TAS-2 deployed on helo flight 20 km from ship WHOI-4 deployed on helo flight 20 km from ship WHOI-6 Deployed next to AWS-1 on ice station 1013 on 11/04 WHOI-2 Deployed next to AWS-2 on ice station 1029 on 11/01 Each AWS record air temp, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, total incident short wave, snow depth, GPS position and snow particles near ground level and at about 1m height. AWS-1 deployed on 1013 AWS-2 deployed on 1029 IMBs record GPS position and temperature in air,snow,ice, and ocean. Sensors also have a heating mode that permit determination of media they are embedded in so that snow and ice thickness can be determined. REFER TO MAKSYM LOGBOOK SCANS FOR MORE DETAILS

  • AM01b borehole site Samples collected during drilling and scientific sampling phases of work. AWS continuing to operate (not a new station, but ongoing AM01 station).

  • AM02 borehole drilled December 2000. Several Niskin water bottle samples collected in ocean cavity. 1.44 m sediment core collected from seafloor at 780 m below sea level. Ongoing Automatic Weather Station data available on: http://aws.acecrc.org.au/ Consult Readme file.

  • Ship-based observations of whales sightings from the original 'ANARE Whale Log' books have been recovered into a single repository of sightings. ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) is the historic acronym for these voyages. Currently there are data from 4 voyages, from the 1990's. Further data will be entered from existing Whale log datasheets on an ongoing basis. Observing platforms currently only include the ship, Aurora Australis. The quality and quantity of abiotic data associated with observations such as air temperature, sea ice cover etc vary immensely from voyage to voyage. Where possible these data have been entered. This dataset contains no information on estimates of survey effort and cannot be used to derive useful presence/absence spatial coverages of species during this period. It is purely sighting data only. Species distribution data are made available to SCAR-MarBIN (http://www.scarmarbin.be), OBIS and GBIF via the DiGIR protocol and Darwin Core schema.

  • AM01 borehole drilled January 2002. Samples collected during drilling and scientific sampling phases of work. AWS continuing to operate.

  • The Antarctic Sea ice Processes and Climate [ASPeCt] data sets submitted here have been collected systematically from the bridge of an icebreaker, while it transited through the pack ice. Quantifiable observations of sea ice thickness and related characteristics of the sea ice, snow, ocean and surface atmosphere are recorded hourly while the vessel moves through the sea ice. If the vessel is stopped or has not moved at least 6nm since the previous observation, no observation will be conducted. The observation protocol has been endorsed by the Scientific Commission for Antarctic Research (under their ASPeCt programme) as the preferred method for conducting ship-based observations of sea-ice characteristics. Details can be found in Worby and Allison [1999] The spreadsheet information below is also included in the word document in the download file. The relevant spreadsheets (xls files) contain the following information: Header name Physical parameter Unit Year Year Date Day/Month/Year Julian Day Day of year Time (UT) Time of day in Universal time: Hours/Minutes/Seconds Lat (oN) Latitude oN Lon(oE) oE Conc Total ice concentration Tenth OW Open-water classification See Worby and Allison [1999] c1 Ice concentration of primary ice category Tenth ty1 Ice type of primary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] iz1 Thickness of primary ice category cm f1 Floe size of primary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] t1 Topography of primary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] s1 Snow type on primary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] sz1 Snow thickness on primary ice category cm c2 Ice concentration of secondary ice category Tenth ty2 Ice type of secondary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] iz2 Thickness of secondary ice category cm f2 Floe size of secondary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] t2 Topography of secondary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] s2 Snow type on secondary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] sz2 Snow thickness on secondary ice category cm c3 Ice concentration of tertiary ice category Tenth ty3 Ice type of tertiary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] iz3 Thickness of tertiary ice category cm f3 Floe size of tertiary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] t3 Topography of tertiary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] s3 Snow type on tertiary ice category See Worby and Allison [1999] sz3 Snow thickness on tertiary ice category cm Sea Sea-surface temperature oC Air Surface-air temperature oC

  • Report of the 1985 A.N.A.R.E to Heard Island. This document contains the following scientific reports: Zoology - elephant seals, fur seals, General Zoology - leopard seals, fish, insects, birds; Botany - lant communities, lichens and mosses; Limnology - Zooplankton and phytoplankton; Earth Sciences - meteorology, geomagnetism, glaciology, general mapping, general phenomena; Miscellaneous Collections; History; Environmental Impact Assessment; Site Clean up; Building report and Camp inventory; Logistics; Field Operations; Recommendations; Bibliography; Appendix. Taken from the report: The 1985 ANARE to Heard island was of greater duration than any since 1963, although brief stopovers have been made by other ANAREs more recently. It was also the first time since the 1950s that biological research was the major scientific endeavour of two ANARE parties working simultaneously at both ends of the island. This reflects renewed interest in The Territory of Heard Island and The McDonald Islands and its surrounding Exclusive Economic Zone, which has a significant fishery potential. As studies on the population of the Island's Elephant Seals may offer methods of monitoring major changes in the relative balance of high level consumers in the marine ecosystem (See below), the expedition had as its highest priority the thorough censusing of Elephant Seals on the Island over the pupping period, as part of an international program aimed at monitoring the total population of these seals. A census of the whole island, by counting seals hauled out on beaches, necessitated two parties; one at Atlas Cove and the other at Spit Bay. The expedition was also given the tasks of carrying out a limited clean up of the old Atlas Cove camp (following an explicit brief which recognised its heritage value), of making a site survey for the proposed camp, and of producing an Environmental Impact Assessment of the proposed site. Other tasks included the deployment of magnetometers and the regular measurement of absolute magnetic values, a comparative meteorological program at either end of the island, an assessment of seal blubber by ultrasound, a collection of Elephant Seal blood samples for electrophoretic analysis, a Fur Seal census, a botanical survey and a general biology program made up of many small sections.

  • NOTE - to access these data, please contact the AADC. The data can only be made available on request. This record provides a listing of meteorological data collected in the Australian Antarctic Territory by members of the Australian Antarctic program (and it's predecessors) and the Bureau of Meteorology. The data have been obtained by manual observations and by automatic weather stations. All data are available from the Bureau of Meteorology, and are considered to be the authoritative source of weather data in the Australian Antarctic Territory (as they have been quality checked). Raw data directly from the automatic weather stations at the stations is available at https://data.aad.gov.au/aws. The data available here includes: - Automatic Weather Station data from 7 sites - Casey, Davis, Macquarie Island, Mawson, Wilkins, Davis Whoop Whoop, and Casey Skiway South. Data resolution varies, but is approximately every 30 minutes. - Daily weather data from 48 sites. Note - not all of these sites are still operational. - Synoptic weather data from 53 sites. Note - not all of these sites are still operational. - Terrestrial soil data from 4 sites. Note - not all of these sites are still operational. - Upper air data from 5 sites. Note - not all of these sites are still operational. - High resolution, 1 minute automatic weather station data from 7 sites - Casey, Davis, Macquarie Island, Mawson, Wilkins, Davis Whoop Whoop, and Casey Skiway South. - Daily and Synoptic data from a number of decommissioned sites. Site details of 24 sites. For full site listings, seeing the file for station details within each dataset ("HM01X_StnDet"). Meteorology data from Wilkes Station, Antarctica 1960 - 1968 - data collected include: temperature (maximum and minimum; dry bulb; wet bulb; dew point), air pressure, wind (direction,speed and maximum gust; run (greater than 3 m)), phenomena, sunshine, cloud. Meteorology data from Casey Station (current) (300017), Antarctica 1989 ongoing, surface measurements - location 66.2792 S, 110.5356 E, with a barometric height of 42.3m. Data collected include the following: temperature (maximum and minimum; dry bulb), air pressure, wind (direction;speed), humidity, rainfall, sunshine, cloud, visibility. An AWS is now in operation at Casey station. Meteorology data from Davis Station (300000), Antarctica 1957 ongoing, surface measurements - location 68.5772 S, 77.9725 E, with a station height of 16.0m and a barometric height of 22.3m. - location 66.2792 S, 110.5356 E, with a barometric height of 42.3m. Data collected include the following: temperature (maximum and minimum; dry bulb; terrestrial minimum, soil temperature), air pressure, wind (direction, speed; run), rainfall, sunshine, cloud, humidity, visibility. An AWS is now in operation at Davis station. Meteorology data from Mawson Station (300001), Antarctica 1954 ongoing, surface measurements - location 67.6014 S, 62.8731 E, with a station height of 9.9m and a barometric height of 16.0m. Data collected include the following: temperature (maximum and minimum; dry bulb), air pressure, wind (direction,speed), humidity, cloud, rainfall, sunshine. An AWS is now in operation at Mawson station. Meteorology data from Macquarie Island Station (300004), 1948 ongoing, surface measurements - location 54.4997 S, 158.9522 E, with a station height of 6.0m, a barometric height of 8.3m and an aerodrome height of 6.0m. Data collected include the following: temperature (maximum and minimum; dry bulb; wet bulb; terrestrial minimum; soil 10cm,20cm,50cm,100cm), air pressure, wind (direction; speed; run), rainfall, sunshine, cloud, visibility, humidity, sea state, radiation. An AWS is now in operation at Macquarie Island station. Meteorology data from Heard Island (Atlas Cove) Station (300005), first installed 1948 - location 53.02 S, 73.39 E, with a station height of 3.0m, and a barometric height of 3.5m. Data collected include the following: temperature, air pressure, rainfall. Meteorology data from Heard Island (The Spit) Station (300028), installed 1992 - location 53.1069 S, 73.7211 E, with a station height of 12.0m and a barometric height of 12.5m. Data collected include the following: temperature (air and minimum terrestrial), air pressure, humidity, wind direction, sunshine, cloud. Meteorology data from Casey Station (current) (300017), Antarctica 1989 ongoing, upper atmosphere measurements - location 66.2792 S, 110.5356 E, with a barometric height of 42.3m. Data collected include the following: upper atmospheric temperature (via a radiosonde), upper atmospheric wind (using a wind find radar). Meteorology data from Davis Station (300000), Antarctica 1957 ongoing, upper atmosphere measurements - location 68.5772 S, 77.9725 E, with a station height of 16.0m and a barometric height of 22.3m. Data collected include the following: upper atmospheric temperature (using radiosonde), upper atmosphere wind (using wind find radar). Meteorology data from Mawson Station (300001), Antarctica 1954 ongoing, upper atmosphere measurements - location 67.6014 S, 62.8731 E, with a station height of 9.9m and a barometric height of 16.0m. Data collected include the following: upper atmosphere temperature and wind (using sounding processor and GPS). Meteorology data from Macquarie Island Station (300004), 1948 ongoing, upper atmosphere measurements - location 54.4997 S, 158.9522 E, with a station height of 6.0m, a barometric height of 8.3m and an aerodrome height of 6.0m. Data collected include the following: upper atmosphere temperature and wind (collected using wind find radar and radiosondes). Meteorology data from Knuckey Peaks Station (300009), 1975 - 1984 - location 67.8 S, 53.5 E. Meteorology data from Heard Island (Atlas Cove) Station (300005), first installed 1948, upper atmosphere measurements - location 53.02 S, 73.39 E, with a station height of 3.0m, and a barometric height of 3.5m. Data recorded include: upper atmosphere temperature, upper atmosphere wind. Meteorology data from Mount King Satellite of Mawson Station (300010), Antarctica, 1975 - 1984 - location 67.1 S, 52.5 E, with a station height of 112.5m. Data recorded include: temperature (dry bulb), air pressure, humidity, visibility, and some upper atmosphere measurements. Meteorology data from Lanyon Junction Station (300011), Antarctica 1983 to 1987 - location 66.3 S, 110.8667 E, with a station height of 470.0m. Observational records include: humidity charts, thermograph charts, pilot balloon flights, and surface observations. Meteorology data from Haupt Nunatak (Casey) Automatic Weather Station (site 300012), installed 1994 - located at 66.5819 S, 110.6939 E near Casey station, with a station height of 81.4m and a barometer height of 83.4m. Data recorded include: barometric pressure, wind direction, speed and gust, and air temperature. Meteorology data from Depot Peak site (300013), Antarctica, installed 1990 - location 69.05 S, 164.6 E, and has a station height of 1600 m. Instruments at the site include: barometer, cup anemometer and humicap (temperature and humidity). Meteorology data from Edgeworth David (Bunger Hills) Station (300014), Antarctica, 1986 to 1989 - location 66.25 S, 100.6036 E, with a station height of 6.0m and a barometric height of 7.0m. Meteorology data from Law Base Station (300015),Antarctica, 1989 - 1992 - location 69.4167 S, 76.5 E, with a station height of 77.0m. Meteorology data from Dovers Station (300016), Antarctica, 1988 to 1992 - located at 70.2333 S, 65.85 E, with a station height of 1058.0m and a barometric height of 1059.0m. Data recorded include: Air pressure, air temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, cloud, visibility and upper atmosphere data. Meteorology data from Balaena Island Automatic Weather Station (300032), installed 1994 - location 66.017 S, 111.0833 E, 22.21 Nm NE of Casey, with a station height of 8.0m and a barometric height of 10m. Data collected from this AWS include: Wind speed and direction, wind gust, air temperature and barometric pressure. Meteorology data from Snyder Rocks Automatic Weather Station (300033), Antarctica, installed 1994 - located at 66.55 S, 107.75 E, with a station height of 40m and a barometric height of 42m. Data collected include: air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed, direction and gust. Meteorology data from Law Dome Summit South Automatic Weather Station (300034), Antarctica, installed 1995 - location 66.717 S, 112.9333 E, with a station height of 1375.0 m. Data collected include: air pressure, air temperature, wind speed and direction. Meteorology data from Casey(old) Station, Antarctica 1969 - 1989. Data collected include: temperature (maximum and minimum; dry bulb; wet bulb; dew point), air pressure, wind (direction,speed and maximum gust; run (greater than 3 m)), phenomena, sunshine, cloud, radiation (global,diffuse).